Team Genius

Rich Karlgaard & Michael S. Malone

Team Genius

The New Science of High-Performing Organizations

Published: July 7, 2015

A groundbreaking book that sheds new light on the vital importance of teams as the fundamental unit of organization and competition in the global economy.

Teams—we depend on them for both our professional success and our personal happiness. But isn't it odd how little scrutiny we give them? The teams that make up our lives are created mostly by luck, happenstance, or circumstance—but rarely by design. In trivial matters—say, a bowling team, the leadership of a neighborhood group, or a holiday party committee—success by serendipity is already risky enough. But when it comes to actions by fast-moving start-ups, major corporations, nonprofit institutions, and governments, leaving things to chance can be downright dangerous.

Offering vivid reports of the latest scientific research, compelling case studies, and great storytelling, Team Genius shows managers and executives that the planning, design, and management of great teams no longer have to be a black art. It explores solutions to essential questions that could spell the difference between success and obsolescence. Do you know how to reorganize your subpar teams to turn them into top performers? Can you identify which of the top-performing teams in your company are reaching the end of their life span? Do you have the courage to shut them down? Do you know how to create a replacement team that will be just as effective—without losing time or damaging morale? And, most important, are your teams the right size for the job?

Throughout, Rich Karlgaard and Michael S. Malone share insights and real-life examples gleaned from their careers as journalists, analysts, investors, and globetrotting entrepreneurs, meeting successful teams and team leaders to reveal some "new truths":

  • The right team size is usually one fewer person than what managers think they need.
  • The greatest question facing good teams is not how to succeed, but how to die.
  • Good "chemistry" often makes for the least effective teams.
  • Cognitive diversity yields the highest performance gains—but only if you understand what it is.
  • How to find the "bliss point" in team intimacy—and become three times more productive.
  • How to identify destructive team members before they do harm.
  • Why small teams are 40 percent more likely to create a successful breakthrough than a solo genius is.
  • Why groups of 7 (± 2), 150, and 1,500 are magic sizes for teams.

Eye-opening, grounded, and essential, Team Genius is the next big idea to revolutionize business. More

The Intel Trinity

Michael S. Malone

The Intel Trinity

How Robert Noyce, Gordon Moore, and Andy Grove Built the World’s Most Important Company

Published: July 15, 2014

The definitive history of the Intel Corporation—the essential company of the digital age—told through the lives of its three preeminent figures: Robert Noyce, Gordon Moore, and Andy Grove

Intel has often been hailed as the most important company in the world, and with good reason: While technology companies come and go, Intel remains, more than four decades after its inception, a defining company of the global digital economy. The legendary inventor of the microprocessor—the single most significant product in the modern world—Intel today builds the tiny "engines" that power almost every intelligent electronic device on the planet.

But the true story of Intel is the human story of the three geniuses behind it. In The Intel Trinity, Michael S. Malone takes an unflinching look at the strengths and weaknesses each member of the trio has brought to Intel, and how, without the perfect balance, the company would never have reached its current level of success. Robert Noyce, the most respected high- tech figure of his generation, brought credibility (and money) to the company's founding; Gordon Moore made Intel the world's technological leader; and Andy Grove relentlessly drove the company to ever-higher levels of success and competitiveness. Without any one of these figures, Intel would never have achieved its historic success; with them, Intel made possible the personal computer, the Internet, telecommunications, and the personal electronics revolution.

Based on unprecedented access to corporate archives, The Intel Trinity reveals the fascinating stories behind the company's ubiquitous products and the unique business practices—including a willingness to commit to new ideas, an initiative to make bold investments in lean times, and a devotion to upholding Gordon Moore's namesake law—that led Intel to consistent success unheard of elsewhere in the tech world.

The Intel Trinity is not just the story of Intel's legendary past; it is also an analysis of the formidable challenges that lie ahead as the company struggles to maintain its dominance, its culture, and its legacy. More